Tag Archives: sue horine

Sue Horine

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Name: Sue Horine
 
Website Link: www.beadartbysue.com
 
Where are you located? I live in Mountain Ranch, California in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains. on ten acres which I share with my significant other Mike, our two dogs Ted and Lizzie, 11 chickens and our 80 year old desert tortoise Mr. Tortie.
 
the-dunesTell us a bit about yourself:  I was born in Pasadena, California where I lived in the same house for 18 years until my family moved to the San Francisco bay area.  For as long as I remember I have had very busy hands.  As a kid I used to draw so much my mother would go to the local newspaper and get the ends of the rolls of newsprint so I could have drawing paper.  There was always some sort of craft project I was involved in.  I would draw and paint for hours, disappear in my dad’s workshop to make candles, wire mobiles, resin flowers and too many things to even remember.  I could totally entertain myself with projects and my parents were very patient! I have traveled all over the west and have lived in several interesting environments.  I made a life change when I turned 30 and abandoned the world of food service, moved to the mountains and became a certified cross country ski instructor in the winter and a bicycle mechanic in the summer.  I opened my own card, gift and bookstore in the ski resort village of Bear Valley, California which I operated for 10 years until I closed it and moved to Mountain Ranch. When I am not beading I work full time at our retail nursery and volunteer a day a week as a dog evaluator at our county animal shelter.  I guess it would be more accurate to say when I am not working or volunteering I find the time to bead!
 
When and why did you begin creating your jewelry/art? In 2006 I found some cabochons my grandparents had cut and polished in the 1960s.  I loved the depth and beauty of the cabs but didn’t quite know what to do with them.  I saw some seed bead work while visiting a friend and my interest in beading was piqued.  I remembered the beading techniques a dear friend had taught me many years ago and so my journey to create beaded cabochons began.  I started out just beading around the cabs and then began to incorporate some bead embroidery.  Many of those first beaded cabs have been remade into more elaborate embroidered pieces.  That’s the great thing about beading – you can rip it all apart and start all over again!
What do you make? Almost all of my jewelry involves cabochons.  Once in a while I will create a piece using only seed beads.  I mostly make necklaces, art neck pieces and some cuff bracelets but I would have to say necklaces are my favorite things to create. 
What materials and methods do you use? Cabochons are my absolute favorite material.  They are the center, the inspiration, the creative force in my work.  I try to incorporate a variety of textures and colors and  I love using size 15 seed beads the most.  They are so tiny and I love the detail they bring to the piece.  Sometimes I have to force myself to use a palate of colors and sizes of beads that I would not naturally choose.  I often rip things apart and start over when the piece is not going where I want it to go.  I mostly do bead embroidery but sometimes incorporate some bead weaving, though I must admit I am not a big fan of bead weaving.  It is very hard for me to follow patterns and instructions, I guess because I always want to follow my heart!  That doesn’t necessarily follow the rules.
 

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Where do your design inspirations come from? It’s all in the stones.   I  see a landscape, a picture, a story needing to be told.   Sometimes I am reminded of a place I have been or a feeling I have had.  Most of the time I just start beading and follow where the beads take me.  I can only remember a couple of times when I have actually designed a piece on paper.  I just don’t work that way.  When I do sketch out a design it is very rare the piece turns out looking like the sketch.
heart-like-a-featherWhat is your best working environment/where is your studio? I have a small spot cleared out on a make-shift desk comprised of an old door set on two file cabinets in the home office for our business.  I clear out a space among the stacks of paper work and bills.  All my beads are stored in two large tackle boxes, which are stacked by the door in the bedroom. Since our house is only 800 square feet my beading can’t take up too much room.  When I create a piece I select all the beads I will need and put everything else away. All the items  I use can be neatly set aside so my work space can become a desk once again.  I would love to have a studio or even my very own work table! I usually work with total silence, sometimes I’ll listen to music.
 
Where can your products be seen? My work can be seen on my web site www.beadartbysue.com and my etsy site www.sedonaskye.etsy.com
 
Magazine articles or press:  I had a piece featured in the “Your Work” section of the April 2008 issue of Bead and Button magazine and have another one scheduled for publication in the June 2009 issue.  One of my necklaces was pictured in the 2007 Fire Mountain Gems Jewelry Makers catalog.
 
Who are you a fan of? There are many great bead artists out there but I would have to say my favorites are Heidi Kummli, Sherry Serafini and Cassandra Graham.
Price range:  Currently $40 to $700
Tell us  a little about one of your favorite creations: I would say my favorite would be Native Dancer.  I was so inspired by the Gathering of Nations Pow Wow in Albuquerque, New Mexico many years ago.  The visual stimulation of the colors and the dancing, swirling costumes and feathers was amazing.  I tried to incorporate all the sensory input I felt there in one piece.  It was the first big piece I created.  When this piece sold I really had mixed emotions.
Native Dancer

Native Dancer

Anything else you wish to add?  For me, beadwork is the ultimate escape.   It is quiet, peaceful, creative and therapeutic.  The possibilities are endless as long as there are beautiful cabochons in the world.  Thank you for the opportunity to share my work with World Artisan Gems.
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